“The details are not the details. They make the design.” — Charles Eames

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Personas are fictional characters which is a representation of the real target audience data, collected in previous research phases such as user interview. Simply it is representing picture of your customers. These representations should be based on qualitative and some quantitative user research and web analytics. Personas are representing the different user types that might use your service, product, site, or brand in a similar way.

This may help you to understand your users’ needs, experiences, behaviors and goals. Personas are distilled essences of real users. Personas do not describe real people, but you compose your personas based on real data collected from multiple individuals. Designers should always create personas from observations about real users, personas should never be invented out of your assumptions about your users. Personas are synthesized from data collected from interviews with users. …


“Some people think design means how it looks. But of course, if you dig deeper, it’s really how it works.”Steve Jobs

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Interaction design, often abbreviated as IxD. Interaction design is an important component within the bunch of topics in user experience (UX) design. Interaction design can be understood in simple terms: it is the design of the interaction between users and products. The goal of interaction design is to create products that enable the user to achieve their objective(s) in the best way possible.

UX design is about shaping the experience of using a product, and most part of that experience involves some interaction between the user and the product. User experience design accounts for all user-facing aspects of a product or system. UX design and interaction design are connected but it’s nearly impossible to create good interaction design in isolation of UX. Well-executed interaction design plays a huge role in the implementation of great UX. Technically, an interaction designer and a user experience designer could work on the same areas of a design. A user experience designer (UXD) focuses on the entire experience between a user and the product, not just the interactions. …


“Empathy is seeing with the eyes of another, listening with the ears of another, and feeling with the heart of another.”

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We don’t know what our users would do or how they think. Visualizing user attitudes and behaviors in an empathy map helps designers align on a deep understanding of end users. An empathy map is a simple, easy-to-digest visual that captures knowledge about a user’s behaviors and attitudes.

An empathy map can represent a group of users, such as a customer segment. The map provides four major areas in which to focus our attention on, thus providing an overview of a person’s experience. …


“People ignore design that ignores people.” — Frank Chimero, Designer

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User experience (UX) design is the process of design teams use to create products that provide meaningful and relevant experiences to users. User experience increases the chances of customers recommending your product by 16.6%. [1] Actually UX can be created with continuous improvement in designs with regards to usability and customer’s perceived quality. UX Design relates to the user’s feelings and product developments.

In general, User Experience is simply how people feel when they use a product or service. …


“Children see magic because they look for it.” — Christopher Moore, writer

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Design for Kids is Based on Their Stage of Physical Development. Designing interfaces and apps for kids is not just a matter of simplification or making the buttons bigger, it requires us to consider interaction models and user experience from the child’s perspective. New research with users aged 3–12 shows that children have gained substantial proficiency in using websites and apps since last studies, though many designs are still not optimized for younger users. Designing for children requires distinct usability approaches, including targeting content narrowly for children of different ages. Children’s cognitive skills are still developing, so their reasoning abilities are weaker than those of adults. …


“People ignore design that ignores people.” — frank chimero

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User-centered design (UCD) is an iterative design process in which designers focus on the users and their needs in each phase of the design process. In UCD, design teams involve users throughout the design process via a variety of research and design techniques, to create highly usable and accessible products for them. You must be positive about finding new solutions to problems if you are a UX designer. I think the big difficulty is to think it is even possible to do so. However, we are now witnessing a clear trend — companies no longer push products to the market. Instead, they focus on the user to personalize a product and at the end deliver what they, the client wants. In here the term user centered designs come. User-centered design is all the talk in UX design. …


“With color one obtains an energy that seems to stem from witchcraft.” ~Henri Matisse

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Colors hold significance for people around the world. Not only do colors influence emotion, but they also hold meaning in religion and various cultures. Every color has its own way to express the feelings. The following is a list of colors and possible meanings of each color.

Yellow

The yellow color may be luminous and vivid, which can contribute to such strong feelings. Yellow can get exposure easily, but when it’s overused it can get abrasive. It may look warm and light, but visual exhaustion can also occur. This one is bright, attention-getting color is seen as a sunny, happy color, yet studies have also shown, paradoxically, that prolonged exposure to it can make adults lose their tempers and babies cry. As well as Yellow is perhaps the most energetic of the warm colors. It is associated with laughter, hope and sunshine. Accents of yellow help give your design energy and will make the viewer feel optimistic and cheerful. However, yellow tends to reflect more light and can irritate a person’s eyes. Too much yellow can be overwhelming and should be used sparingly. In design, it is often used to grab attention in an energetic and comforting way. …


“Color is a power which directly influences the soul.” ~Wassily Kandinsky

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Certain shades or tones may result in very different meanings. Also, the context around the color, and even surrounding colors, can have an effect.

Let’s dive into the emotions and feelings that different colors can evoke.

Black

The color black has different symbolic meanings. Black evokes power, luxury, elegance, but can also mean professionalism, neutrality and simplicity. It’s bold, powerful and is often used to evoke mystery. In certain contexts and cultures the color black can also refer to mourning or sadness. But individual reactions to the color black can vary widely. According to German scientist Hermann von Helmholz, “Black is real sensation, even if it is produced by entire absence of light. …


“With color one obtains an energy that seems to stem from witchcraft.” ~Henri Matisse

Image for post
Image for post

Colors hold significance for people around the world. Not only do colors influence emotion, but they also hold meaning in religion and various cultures. Every color has its own way to express the feelings. The following is a list of colors and possible meanings of each color.

Yellow

The yellow color may be luminous and vivid, which can contribute to such strong feelings. Yellow can get exposure easily, but when it’s overused it can get abrasive. It may look warm and light, but visual exhaustion can also occur. This one is bright, attention-getting color is seen as a sunny, happy color, yet studies have also shown, paradoxically, that prolonged exposure to it can make adults lose their tempers and babies cry. As well as Yellow is perhaps the most energetic of the warm colors. It is associated with laughter, hope and sunshine. Accents of yellow help give your design energy and will make the viewer feel optimistic and cheerful. However, yellow tends to reflect more light and can irritate a person’s eyes. Too much yellow can be overwhelming and should be used sparingly. In design, it is often used to grab attention in an energetic and comforting way. …


“Color is a power which directly influences the soul.” ~Wassily Kandinsky

Image for post
Image for post

Certain shades or tones may result in very different meanings. Also, the context around the color, and even surrounding colors, can have an effect.

Let’s dive into the emotions and feelings that different colors can evoke.

Black

The color black has different symbolic meanings. Black evokes power, luxury, elegance, but can also mean professionalism, neutrality and simplicity. It’s bold, powerful and is often used to evoke mystery. In certain contexts and cultures the color black can also refer to mourning or sadness. But individual reactions to the color black can vary widely. According to German scientist Hermann von Helmholz, “Black is real sensation, even if it is produced by entire absence of light. …

About

Dinushi Supunsala

Hey there, I’m undergraduate of University of Moratuwa, Sri Lanka and passionate about UI/UX designing and to give meaningful solutions to everyday life.

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